How long will your corporate video be relevant for?

The question on the lips of a lot of marketing managers and directors is, if they invest in a video, how long will it 'last' before becoming irrelevant? This post will explain how long it should be before you re-invest in a video, if at all. 

The other day I was in a meeting with some potential clients. They were looking to increase their digital media presence both for themselves, and for their own clients. But they weren't sure how long a video would 'last' once purchased. 

Point-in-time vs longevity

Any consulting firm and business can change with increasing demand, competition, changing priorities and more. 

Therefore, it can be remiss to invest in a video, if you think that you will be presenting something completely different in 6-12 months time. 

But here's what you should be actually thinking about:

"Can I afford to whip up a video right now for tomorrow's launch, or should I be thinking 3-6 months ahead, and make a video for that?"

My advice is the latter. 

Being proactive is always the smartest play with online video content and here's why:

You're organised.

There's nothing worse than trying to create content 'in arrears', and video can be even more difficult.

The reality is that it takes time to create video content, so if you're behind the 8-ball, you may never get back in front of it. 

So when you're thinking about quality video content in advance, you are going to be way ahead of your competition already. 

This is especially pertinent for software products or any viable product that hasn't even been built yet. 

Put 'explainer video' in your pre-launch sprint, because having a proof-of-concept video ready to go upon release will be super potent for lead generation and sales. 

Clients are often concerned that if they make a video, then it's finished. And if anything in their product or process changes, the video won't be able to affect that.

9 out of 10 times, a simple change request can be filed, and we can punch-in the changes without a problem. This can lengthen the life cycle of the video, potentially infinitely. 

But there are video types that have a longer shelf-life, from inception and can be a reliable website/social media salesman.

Live action is a great video type that can last for a long time

Purely because the nature of live action video, it creates a sense of trust in the viewer. Once people see a real human being, certain fears (often subconscious) are quashed. 

Getting your CEO on camera and talking about how great your workplace is, is a video that will last for a long time.

The only reason this will become irrelevant is if your workplace becomes a terrible place to work!

Video case studies are timeless for longevity. They show the world that you're the real deal, deliver high quality work to satisfied clients. Success has no statute of limitations. 

But here is the bottom line, it doesn't mean that you just make a video and stop.

While live action can last for a long time, you should fill your digital media arsenal with a catalogue of premium videos that will pay off into the future. 

These can be recruitment videos, video testimonials, summary videos of annual general meetings, interviews with employees, video for your lobby/next convention. 

These kinds of videos can be the difference between winning work and not. Between recruiting a rockstar employee, and getting a second banana on board. 

Bringing it all together...

We prefer to make videos with as much advance time and expertise poured in as possible. It helps us not pull our hair out, but it will also be the best possible product for your business. 

Having said that, you can make videos that exist 'in the now' but will actually pay off long into the future. Whether it's animation or live action, we make videos that can last for a long time and are able to be chopped and changed, where necessary. 

Until next time,

Pete

PS - if you have ever worried that video has a short life cycle, we can explain how it will actually last long into the future. Get in touch below to find out how:

Top Three Reasons To Choose Animation For Your Next Video Project

I have always been fascinated with animation. Ever since I was young, watching old Disney films where it was done manually, up to "The Simpsons" and more recently - the magnificent animated creativity and storytelling of "Rick and Morty". 

We produce animated videos not just because we like the way they look, but because they're actually a super versatile digital asset. This post will explain why you should choose animation for your next video.

We have pinned it down to three overarching reasons:

They can be made quickly

Thank goodness we don't live in the days of manual animation like Snow White and the Seven Dwarves, because that looked like an absolute nightmare. Months of work to make scenes, years to make a feature film.

The wonders of technology have made production of animation a seamless and dynamic process. On average, our animated videos take 3-6 weeks to produce. That's dedicated storyboarding, animation and post-production.

One thing we do that is similar to what was done in the early days of animation, is hand-drawn storyboards. These give the client an initial 'feel' of what the video will look like. A lot of clients like to know that real artists are busily working away on the right style and graphics that align to their brand and/or product.  

And while we have moved away from template animation style (which is quicker, but ultimately too generic), we can still churn out high quality videos quickly, with multiple people working simultaneously on the project to get it out the door. 
 

It's often the most accessible

When I use the word 'accessible', I mean it in terms of it being able to be experienced by persons with disabilities/impairments. 

We have had the opportunity to work with clients such as the Australian Network on Disability who taught us a lot about accessibility in content, web images and indeed animation.

We have taken that forward into producing our videos, to ensure that colour balance, speed of voiceover speech and text size are all able to be viewed by people with audio and visual impairments. 

An audio-visual-accessible video we produced for the Australian Network on Disability

 

The beauty of the animated video is that you have complete control over all of the variables that can cause issues for accessibility, and we have found it's best and easier to err on the side of making them accessible from the video's inception. 

It's versatile across different channels

You've probably heard that video is an extremely shareable asset, which is true. But 'video' is an all-too-nebulous term. 

Animation is really something that is the most versatile to be shared, but why?

Ultimately it's about editing. With animation, you can construct various lengths of videos more easily, to be shared on different channels.

Have the full length 90 second on your landing page - make a 15 or 30 second clip especially for Twitter or Instagram ads. Go pro and make a 'full version' up to 2 minutes for YouTube. 

This is something that needs to be constructed from the inception of the video, not done after-the-fact. Otherwise, you run into issues of flow and clarity just like any other video project.

Bringing it all together...

So as you can see - there are a few reasons I like animation. Not because of nostalgia and entertainment, but also as a really useful business tool. An animated video can be made quickly, easily, and is appealing to lots of types of viewers, no matter what your niche is. 

Until next time,

Pete

PS - if you like remember and prefer the 'old school' Simpsons, you might like to share this post. 

Interested working together? Get in touch below and see how we can help you.

Four types of video that every consulting firm needs

 
 

Consulting firms are often paralysed by what video content they should be putting out. This post will teach you which video forms to produce, so there is no more guesswork.

'Company culture' video

With the advent of social media comes the judging eye of everyone who stumbles upon your firm. 

Whether you're a tier one international conglomerate, or a small local firm - people are going to have a preconceived idea of what your firm looks like, and how you operate. 

So what do you do? Let people judge and make up their own minds? No thanks - take the reins and open the doors to your business.

Company culture videos are becoming a very popular (and easy) way to change your corporate persona from 'too big to care' to 'come on in - we're friendly and efficient'.

A good example of this type of video is one done for the Synergy Group in Canberra, ACT. With the advent of their new office space, they opted to show off their new, funky surrounds combined with informal talking heads and b-roll.

It's a great example of how easy it is to open the doors to your business, and show that real human beings work there, are normal and want to help you.

 

Video case studies

You need to be able to prove that you're a credible, reliable and appealing firm. So showing off your work through case studies should be at the top of the list. 

The folly of case studies is that they're usually boring (unless you produced something SUPER interesting!). 

So to 'unbore-ify' your case studies - turn them into a video, or at least supplement the written content with a video.

The power of having someone talk about a successful project, detailing problems, solutions and the outcome is huge. The key, is to have the 'talent' talk informally, but professionally and confidently about the project.

'Ums and ahhs' are OK - that's how people talk! But have a clear structure to follow, so your video is not aimless. This is where having the written case study is useful for direction. 

This is a good example of a well-produced video case study, incorporating confident speakers and effective use of B-roll to keep the audience engaged. 

Animated explainer video

Our favourite! So easy and so powerful.

When people ask me what my company produces and I mention 'animated explainer videos' as part of the arsenal, some of them look back at me quizzically.

But I guarantee them that they have seen one, because they're everywhere. 

I see animation as the ultimate entry-point - it appeals to pretty much everyone, which is powerful for engagement. It does what its title suggests - explains. And because your canvas is creatively endless, you can explain almost anything.

Example of a deep dive into a product, using animation as the entry point

One we are very proud of is the Parramatta 2021 video we produced for the City of Parramatta. It captured a unique aesthetic as well as informed a wide constituent base about a variety of topics.

The great thing about animated videos is that they are shareable as well. This particular video was syndicated across the
Daily Telegraph in Australia.

They're also great for selling products. You can construct an animated video in exactly the way you want, using persuasive triggers and copy with a strong call to action.

We are experts in end-to-end production, producing everything from start to finish (plus some added bonuses) to make the ultimate animated explainer video. 

Video testimonials

What better way to show off your wares (successes) than by getting the people you helped in front of the camera? 

If you have ever watched Danoz Direct and seen people praising the wonder of 'Space Bags' or the 'Nutri Bullet', you have seen a video testimonial.

Now, don't get us wrong - we know that most of those people are paid actors, and often the products are substandard or even worse, useless to most people. But come on, the actors showing their miserable lives 'before' whatever the product is, is pretty great.

Here's a hilarious video compilation of some of the best (worst!). 

But the fact is, some 'real people' (non-actors) aren't comfortable getting in front of the camera, so actors are required to make it look professional. 

And really, it doesn't matter if you use paid actors to talk about how good a product or service is. What matters is that the experience is genuine - and you back that up with your next customers.

To make things easier on yourself though, there are many resources that allow talent in front of the camera to talk at ease about their experience with your product or service. If you can convince them to be comfortable on-camera with a few simple questions, everyone wins.

Bringing it all together

Consulting firms can shoulder through the saturated market by using one or all of these video methods to get ahead.

Giving your customer base an extra insight into your business, through live action and animated methods is a great way to show that you're human, you're legitimate and you sell services. 

Signing off,

Pete

PS - if you laugh at hilarious infomercial fails, you might enjoy working with us on your next video project.

Want to chat more? Click below to get in touch.

How to Write a Great Script For Your Online Video

This post will give you the tools on how to write a great script for your next video.

Scriptwriting is the most important aspect of making a video. It is often overlooked however in the interest of producing the fancy end-product. 

This is a short-sighted approach, and will fail because a fancy end-product without a solid foundation will be useless. 

Writing a good script will form the foundation of your video and also ensure the production is speedy and efficient.

So, what is the process for writing a script that will guarantee you an awesome video? Read on...

 

Step One: Attention

Alec Baldwin in 'glengarry glen ross' (1992) explaining how to sell to leads

Alec Baldwin in 'glengarry glen ross' (1992) explaining how to sell to leads

"A-I-D-A".

You may have heard of screenwriter/playwright David Mamet. One of his best works is the play-turned-film 'Glengarry Glen Ross' (1992).

The story explores the machinations and relationships of a small real estate office. In one of the greatest sales speeches put to film, a cameo from Alec Baldwin explains (perhaps a little harshly) how to sell leads using basic influence and structure.

Aside from his 'A-B-C - Always Be Closing' mantra, he also educates the meagre salesmen in front of him with:

Attention
Interest
Decision
Action

A-I-D-A. 

"Attention - do I have your attention?"

That's pretty much it. It's basic, but extremely important. If you don't have the attention of the viewer, you have nothing. So your script should grab the attention immediately.

This can be through a visual and/or through a voiceover queue. Our trained scriptwriters tend to do both. For example:

As you can see, we're not talking about jarring, Danoz Direct-style "HEY YOU" stuff here (although that is very powerful too), but we are getting the attention of the viewer straight away.

The audio is the key element here - because we know the stakeholders who will be watching the video. So we frame the opening line around them, and their potential problem we will be solving.

 

Step Two: Problem definition

If you thought I was going to just regurgitate what Alec Baldwin says in this post, you were mistaken.

While his speech is potent for selling to leads, it doesn't quite fit here. What does fit is the necessity to define the problem of the person watching - this is how you connect with them in an instant.

Sometimes you can mould this into the 'Attention' phase. While we prefer a certain rigidity with our scriptwriting, you can definitely bend the rules here, because the problem definition might be a part of your attention-grabbing headline.

For example:

So you see it's straight to the point of the problem. It's a 'yes or no' question and it makes people think that way when you ask it. "Yes, I do find myself bored on weeknights, itching to play sport...what is this product or service they are offering?".

Now, we don't pretend that peoples' brains say that sentence verbatim, but the initial reaction is along those lines.

Or, it's not - and that's ok. In fact that's great, because it means your question is clear.

 

Step Three: Solution to Problem

What's a problem without a solution? A huge pain-in-the-neck.

So you have to solve your stakeholders' problem right away to warm them up to whatever your service or product you have. It seems obvious, and is crucial to getting them onside, but it's really the easiest part.

The hard part? Actually having something to show off and sell, but that's not our problem!

For example:

This part of the script is usually the most detailed and wordy, so the above example is just a snippet of a larger problem solution.

Ensure you cover everything that should be covered, make it sound attractive and if possible, it should trigger emotions in the viewer. Make them want whatever it is you're selling - remember you just solved their problem.

You're now their favourite prospect.

 

Step Four: Call to Action

The viewer still needs a bit of help in getting there though. So make sure you give them a clear call to action at the end. That might be 'buy now' or 'sign up' or 'learn more'. A good call to action is a short and uncomplicated one.

For example:

So let's recap. 

As you can see, it's not rocket science. This script method is the most useful for us, and yields the best results when writing scripts for a variety of industries. So try it out, and let us know what you think!

Or, if you need a script done, get in touch with us - we've got the process nailed...

Signing off,

Pete

 

PS - if you enjoy Alec Baldwin films you might enjoy sharing this post on Facebook or LinkedIn or Twitter - or all three - we don't discriminate.

Want to chat more? Click below to get in touch.